Oct 162013
 

Landscaping Your Garden in Stages – Part 2

Stage two, where you maybe put in a pool and other areas for entertaining

Stage two, where you maybe put in a pool and other areas for entertaining

As we suggested in Landscaping Stage 1, it is usually not going to be possible to build in all the plants, features or utilities into a garden when you initially start to build a house.

These are facilities that will normally be completed over a number of years as extra monies become available. But it is still essential to try to stick to the plan that you started out with.

This second phase now adds to all the initial planting and all the spadework done in the first phase, and modifications can now be made as you see the design unfolding.

It will mould your basic design into an attractive finished garden that will add value to your property and will be something to be proud of.

This second phase for a mid-sized property was drawn up by Stellenbosch landscaper, Wendy Attwell.

Phase Two

Please note the letters in brackets refer to the same letters in the sketch. Please also note that we have used common names for the plants, and have put their botanical names in brackets. The pictures of plants are displayed below in the order that they are used in the article.

LandscapingOBPhase2-sOnce the essential groundwork has been done, and trees have been planted, pathways planned, and so on, more costly features may be considered. These include a swimming pool and/or perhaps a spa, ponds, paving and more detailed planting. While a portion of the front garden remains the same, with periwinkle and now established bushes, the ground cover is removed on one side of the path and a formal pond (T) is constructed under theCape chestnut tree. Aquatic plants – Monkey flower (Mimulus lewisii) with its attractive mauve flowers, and rabbit-ear iris (Iris laevigata) – are set within the pond, while various ferns, Papyrus sedge (Cyperus papyrus), asparagus fern – also known as foxtail fern (Asparagus aethiopicus), the tubular lily-like amaryllis (Crinum bulbispermum) and large wild iris (Dietes grandiflora) are grown around the periphery. Stout-growing tree ferns (Cyathea dregei) are set around the base of the tree. The gravel path and driveway are now paved for practical and aesthetic reasons and a carport (U) is added alongside the garage. Periwinkles are planted as a ground cover under the Liquidambars. Nothing changes down the service side of the garden, and all the basic planting has already been done outside the main bedroom. However, a spa (V) is now installed with great care being taken not to damage the established foliage.

Monkey flower (Mimulus lewisii)

Monkey flower (Mimulus lewisii)

As an added touch, sweet-smelling pink jasmine (Jasminum polyanthum) is planted behind the conifers and junipers. The path leading from the patio is now paved and a sundial, fountain, bird bath or some other feature (W) is set in the little clearing at the end. A garden shed (X) is constructed on a nearby boundary. The final task at hand is to establish the entertainment area; to install the swimming pool (Y), pave an area extending from the patio and braai/barbecue to the pool (Z), and to add foliage plants under the palm trees. To create a lush tropical effect, the choice here is papyrus (Cyperus papyrus), New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax), cordylines (C. australis) and indigenous cycads (Encephalartos villosus, E. transvenosus and E. altensteinil).

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Rabbit-ear iris (Iris laevigata)

Rabbit-ear iris (Iris laevigata)

Papyrus sedge (Cyperus papyrus)

Asparagus fern also known as Foxtail fern (Asparagus aethiopicus)

Asparagus fern also known as Foxtail fern (Asparagus aethiopicus)

Amaryllis (Crinum bulbispermum)

Large wild iris (Dietes grandiflora)

Large wild iris (Dietes grandiflora)

Tree ferns (Cyathea dregei)

Pink jasmine (Jasminum polyanthum)

Pink jasmine (Jasminum polyanthum)

New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax)

New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax)

Cordyline "red star" (C. australis)

Cordyline “red star” (C. australis)

Cycad-villosus-s

Cycads (Encephalartos villosus)

Cycad (Encephalartos transvenosus)

Cycad (Encephalartos transvenosus)

Cycad (Encephalartos altensteinil).

 

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